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9 Ways to Deal with Splitting the Party

Occasionally players will send their characters off in different directions to try to save time by accomplishing tasks simultaneously (at least in game-time). Sometimes they’ll do this in response to a Game Master deadline. Sometimes it’s hardwired into the game such as when a Game Master purposefully splits them up to make them more vulnerable. Sometimes the player characters just feel like it’s a solid option regardless of Game Master nudging. While this often sounds good in theory (get more stuff done at the same time, make people feel vulnerable), a split party has a lot of logistical issues that get in the way.

A split party often means that tense scene will need to be snappy or you’ll either bore the uninvolved players or potentially throw off the pacing by swapping back and forth.  If the players don’t pay full attention to what they wanted to do, the entire scene might take longer as they have to be brought up to speed time and again.

Uninvolved players are likely to get bored if too much time passes or frustrated if you flick back and forth too quickly. They might turn to mobile phones or flicking through rulebooks or gossiping among themselves if their attention span isn’t ironclad — even if your game is otherwise riveting.¬† So what can you do to off-set this?

Continue reading “9 Ways to Deal with Splitting the Party”

Helping players out with Hard Mode Investigation

Investigation-based games are hard. You can’t just run up to the enemy and roll dice at them until they go away. No, you have to find the clues, understand the clues, locate more clues, understand them, then put together a picture and figure out what to do about it. Add a horror element and it becomes all the more brutal as mistakes can be lethal if the players don’t adequately search for clues before busting down that locked door to the room containing that shoggoth.

When these clue trails confuse and overwhelm new players it’s often frustrating for all concerned.

Introducing the Clue Token.

This handy little device can be rewarded for playing within the genre and can then be used to get players out of an intellectual bind.  You could reward them for looking before leaping, exhaustively searching the crime scene, making a point to interview witnesses in a productive manner, using ingenuity to solve problems, using teamwork to surmount obstacles, avoiding pain the way real people do, exercising caution rather than just trying to roll dice at a monster until it goes away, showing the strain of the horror situation in character, retaining excellent in-game focus, or anything else that really helps the game.

They can collect up to three of these little babies and then use them to get a free hint to do with the situation at hand. The hint could range from reminding them of their ability to search scenes, pointing out a connection between clues that went unnoticed or telling them that certain clues can be used as leverage against certain NPCs. It could even be used to negate a bad roll that meant they overlooked an important clue.  Maybe there’s something the character should know but the player doesn’t and it gives you an excuse to point out some skills on thiir character sheet.  Sometimes if the clue trail break down has reached a brick wall it might mean that you create a new clue entirely that helps the game move forward such as having the password to that computer written down on a post-it note tacked to the side.

I trialled this system years ago with a group of players who had little to no experience in the investigative genre of game and it turned out to be really effective.  I used the clue tokens from the Arkham Horror Board Game to represent them so that the players had a physical reminder at hand.  I gave them a single free clue token at the start of the session and told them that this freebie will disappear at the end of the night in order to encourage them to use them rather than hoard them. Otherwise they might have hoarded it and never learned the value of using them.  Later tokens could be carried over between sessions.

Do you have any hints or tricks to help out players with a difficult investigation?

10 Ways to Clue in Characters as a GM

So you’ve created a brilliant piece of investigative adventure write up which has a list of interesting plot points that all lead inexorably to the ending fact – a fact that will shake the foundations of the character’s reality. You pull out the dice. You hand out their sheets. Everyone takes a seat. It’s play time!

One flunked roll or neglected clue later and the characters are all scratching their heads and having a drink down the pub with no idea where they should go next. No problem! You introduce a handy NPC who’s figured out the clue and the team go to the next location only to completely misinterpret the next clue and run off on a wild goose chase.

So what do you do?

Continue reading “10 Ways to Clue in Characters as a GM”

Welcome to ARC Inc.

We started the Adelaide Roleplaying Community Inc. in 2014 so that we could bring a range of different games to fruition in Adelaide. We began with a single Vampire: the Requiem LARP campaign slated to go for 1 1/2 years and now we have murder mysteries, tabletop days, political games, sandbox campaign LARPs, terrifying events involving zombies and other horrors and games where you dress up as elves and hit each other with foam swords.

We’re hoping to put together as much information on various gaming organisations and meet up groups in Adelaide in one spot so that local gamers can find games more equally. ¬†Hopefully we can also help people set up the games they want to run so we will also be posting weekly articles on local events, locally developed roleplaying games and simple advice articles filled with handy tips on roleplaying games both in tabletop and LARP form.

If you’re interested in contributing to this web-site, please contact us at adelaideroleplayingcommunity@gmail.com